Teaching children to deal with disputes from a young age, can equip them to deal with conflict in a positive and respectful manner later in life.

Events that occur in childhood can shape how individuals deal with situations throughout their lives. On the final day of Mediation Week, we explore why it is important for children and young adults to develop peace-keeping skills, in order to grow into empathetic and ethical leaders of the future.

Mediation provides an ideal environment for an honest dialogue that can lead to apology and forgiveness.

At its essence, forgiveness provides an opportunity to create a new story. While it does not negate accountability, it can in fact empower individuals. On day five of Mediation Week, we learn about apology and forgiveness in conflict resolution.

The CAB system goes beyond just resolving disputes, and focuses in a broader sense on restoring harmony and unity in relationships.

As a faith community, we are guided by ethical principles that bind us together regardless of our different cultures, experiences, and expectations. These include compassion, kindness, integrity, dignity, and honesty. On day four of Mediation Week, we explore how these principles can apply in restoring peace in our relationships.

Our unconscious biases can, and regularly do, conflict with our conscious opinions.

Do you ever wonder why we think it’s important to make a good first impression? Or why we are drawn to like-minded people? The answer lies in the role of unconscious bias and how quickly we make judgments about each other. On day three of Mediation Week, we find out how to recognise and counter hidden biases.

The National Conciliation and Arbitration Board for the United Kingdom invites the Jamat to celebrate Conflict Resolution Day 2018 by attending an evening discussion on the "Tradition of Mediation in Islam".

By allowing people to tell their story and listening to them properly, we validate them and their life experiences.

How many times have you looked at a family member or a colleague, and wondered whether they are really listening or have really understood what you just said? On day two of Mediation Week, we learn about listening to acknowledge and better understand one another.

In recent years, the approach to conflict resolution has shifted from a traditional “facilitative” approach to a more “transformative” approach, which focuses on empowering disputants to interact with one another by better understanding and recognising each other’s needs and interests.

Mediation Week is recognised in countries around the world every October to highlight the value of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) as a constructive and cost-effective alternative to litigation. To mark the occasion, the Aga Khan International Conciliation and Arbitration Board (ICAB) have prepared a series of articles to share their insights. On day one, we look at the ethical underpinnings and best practice in the field of mediation and dispute resolution.

The Aga Khan Conciliation and Arbitration Board for the Democratic Republic of Congo ("NCAB DRC") is comprised of 7 volunteer mediators.

The Aga Khan Conciliation and Arbitration Board for Afghanistan ("NCAB Afghanistan") is comprised of 13 volunteer mediators.

CAB USA partners with other dispute resolution organizations in the U.S to celebrate a series of Mediators' Forums in Georgia, Illinois, and Texas to share techniques and best practices in mediation.

The Aga Khan Conciliation and Arbitration Board for Pakistan ("CAB Pakistan") is comprised of 411 volunteer mediators serving on a national board, regional boards, and local panels.

The Aga Khan Conciliation and Arbitration Board for Syria ("CAB Syria") is comprised of 44 volunteer mediators serving on a national board and local boards.

The Aga Khan Conciliation and Arbitration Board for Tajikistan ("NCAB Tajikistan") is comprised of 9 volunteer mediators.

The Aga Khan Conciliation and Arbitration Board for Uganda ("NCAB Uganda") is comprised of 5 volunteer mediators.

The Aga Khan Conciliation and Arbitration Board for Madagascar ("NCAB Madagascar") is comprised of 7 volunteer mediators.

The Aga Khan Conciliation and Arbitration Board for France ("NCAB France") is comprised of 7 volunteer mediators.

The Aga Khan Conciliation and Arbitration Board for Canada ("CAB Canada") is comprised of 46 volunteer mediators serving on a national board and five regional boards.

The Conciliation and Arbitration Boards operate in 18 jurisdictions and in over 25 countries around the world. Below is the list of jurisdictions along with a link to a page with additional information about each CAB. 

The Aga Khan Conciliation and Arbitration Board for Iran ("NCAB Iran") is comprised of 7 volunteer mediators.

The Aga Khan Conciliation and Arbitration Board for Tanzania ("CAB Tanzania") is comprised of 14 volunteer mediators, including 3 co-opted mediators.