Festivals

The folio depicts several angels, along with Buraq, the winged horse the holy Prophet is said to have ridden on Mi’raj.
The folio depicts several angels, along with Buraq, the winged horse the holy Prophet is said to have ridden on Mi’raj.
Mi‘raj — The night journey
Mi‘raj — The night journey
20 March 2020

This week, Ismailis around the world join many of their brothers and sisters in the wider Muslim Ummah in observing Mi‘raj. Esoteric interpretations of Islam tend to emphasise the spiritual significance of Mi‘raj, which is seen as a symbol of the journey of the soul, and the human potential to rise above the trappings of material life.

The first day of spring brings an outlook of hope and optimism.
The first day of spring brings an outlook of hope and optimism.
Navroz
Navroz
20 March 2020

This week, Ismaili Muslims worldwide observe Navroz (Nowruz), a festival that marks the beginning of a new year and the first day of spring. More generally, it signifies a time of spiritual renewal and physical rejuvenation, as well as a spirit of gratitude for blessings and an outlook of hope and optimism.

Mawlana Hazar Imam sends a message for the Jamat
Mawlana Hazar Imam sends a message for the Jamat
20 March 2020

On the occasion of Navroz, The Ismaili is pleased to share a message from Malik Talib, Chairman of the Ismaili Leaders’ International Forum, which includes a message from Mawlana Hazar Imam.

Video: Navroz greetings from the global Jamat
19 March 2020

Navroz Mubarak from the global Jamat! While we are practicing physical distancing, remain connected to each other and celebrate the new year together with these video messages from all over the world.

In this work of art, the sun and star bear the name of Hazrat Ali, while the wood panel from the Fatimid period pays homage to the rich historic artistic traditions of the Ismaili community.
In this work of art, the sun and star bear the name of Hazrat Ali, while the wood panel from the Fatimid period pays homage to the rich historic artistic traditions of the Ismaili community.
Yawm-e Ali
Yawm-e Ali
6 March 2020

This week, Ismailis and other Muslims mark Yawm‐e Ali, which commemorates the birthday of Hazrat Ali. The cousin and son-in-law of Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him and his family), Hazrat Ali is recognised as the most important spiritual and intellectual authority in Islam after the Holy Prophet. On the occasion of Yawm-e Ali, Ismaili Muslims renew their commitment to the principles that Hazrat Ali exemplified, particularly the ethics of care, compassion, generosity, integrity, tolerance, forgiveness, brotherhood, and service to others.

Mawlana Hazar Imam is presented with a cake on behalf of the worldwide Jamat on the occasion of his 80th birthday.
Mawlana Hazar Imam is presented with a cake on behalf of the worldwide Jamat on the occasion of his 80th birthday.
Salgirah
Salgirah
12 December 2019

On 13 December 2019, Ismailis around the world will celebrate Mawlana Hazar Imam’s 83rd birthday — an occasion to reflect on the unique spiritual bond that links each murid to the Imam-of-the-Time.

Calligraphy bearing the name of Prophet Muhammad, in traditional Thuluth script. The pattern is thought to be inspired by a 19th century disc from the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul.
Calligraphy bearing the name of Prophet Muhammad, in traditional Thuluth script. The pattern is thought to be inspired by a 19th century disc from the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul.
Milad-un-Nabi
Milad-un-Nabi
7 November 2019

This week, Muslims around the world commemorate Milad-un-Nabi, literally meaning the “birth of the Prophet.” Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him and his family) was born in Mecca in the year 570 CE and grew up to be a respected merchant, known for his honesty, integrity and trustworthiness. At the age of 40, he received his first revelation from Allah, marking the commencement of his mission as Allah's last and final messenger.

An Arabic-script ambigram, where ‘Muhammad’ upside down is read as ‘Ali’ and vice versa.
An Arabic-script ambigram, where ‘Muhammad’ upside down is read as ‘Ali’ and vice versa.
Eid-e Ghadir
Eid-e Ghadir
17 August 2019

This week, Shia Muslims throughout the world, including Ismailis, mark Eid-e Ghadir. The festival commemorates the pivotal event at Ghadir Khumm when, by divine command, Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him and his family) designated Hazrat Ali as the first in the continuing line of hereditary Imams.

Eid al-Adha reminds us of the love, devotion, and sacrifice of Hazrat Ibrahim and Hazrat Ismail (peace be upon them).
Eid al-Adha reminds us of the love, devotion, and sacrifice of Hazrat Ibrahim and Hazrat Ismail (peace be upon them).
Eid al-Adha
Eid al-Adha
10 August 2019

This week, Muslims around the world are observing Eid al-Adha, the Festival of Sacrifice. The occasion recalls the monotheistic ethos at the heart of the Abrahamic traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Mawlana Hazar Imam shares a light moment with the Jamat at the Diamond Jubilee Darbar in Lisbon, as Prince Amyn, Princess Zahra, Prince Rahim and Princess Salwa, Prince Hussain, Prince Aly Muhammad, Miss Sara Boyden, and Master Iliyan Boyden look on.
Mawlana Hazar Imam shares a light moment with the Jamat at the Diamond Jubilee Darbar in Lisbon, as Prince Amyn, Princess Zahra, Prince Rahim and Princess Salwa, Prince Hussain, Prince Aly Muhammad, Miss Sara Boyden, and Master Iliyan Boyden look on.
Imamat Day
Imamat Day
10 July 2019

Foremost among the principles of the Shia Ismaili Tariqah of Islam is the recognition of the Imam of the Time. Imamat Day is an occasion to reaffirm this principle, express gratitude to Mawlana Hazar Imam, and to reaffirm our spiritual allegiance to the Imam and our commitment to the ethics of the faith.

The sighting of the new moon signals the beginning of a new month in the Islamic calendar
The sighting of the new moon signals the beginning of a new month in the Islamic calendar
Eid ul-Fitr
Eid ul-Fitr
3 June 2019

Muslims around the world look forward to Eid ul-Fitr as an occasion of peace, happiness, joy and festivity. It is a day for special prayers and the extension of forgiveness and generosity.

In his Khamsa, Shab-i Qadr (the Night of Power), the renowned Persian poet Amir Khusraw Dihlavi (d. 1325 CE) tells the story of a saint who made a failed attempt to stay awake until the Laylat al-Qadr.
In his Khamsa, Shab-i Qadr (the Night of Power), the renowned Persian poet Amir Khusraw Dihlavi (d. 1325 CE) tells the story of a saint who made a failed attempt to stay awake until the Laylat al-Qadr.
Laylat al-Qadr
Laylat al-Qadr
26 May 2019

Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him and his family) habitually retreated from his daily life to meditate on the higher truths of human existence. After fifteen years of this meditative practice, during one of his annual retreats in the cave of Hira just outside the city of Mecca, he received his first call of revelation on what subsequently came to be called Laylat al-Qadr.

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