Health and Wellness

Chuqander (Beetroot).
Chuqander (Beetroot).
C is for… Chuqander (Beetroot)
C is for… Chuqander (Beetroot)
17 April 2014

Chuqander are usually a deep red colour but there are varieties ranging from white, orange and even striped. Both the beets and their greens can be eaten as they are tasty and full of unique nutritious properties.

Badaam (Almonds)
Badaam (Almonds)
B is for… Badaam (Almonds)
B is for… Badaam (Almonds)
3 April 2014

You may have memories of your grandma telling you to eat “saath (seven) badaam a day.” Well, as explained in this latest Nutrition Centre A to Z article, research suggests that she was giving you good advice!

Amla (Indian gooseberry) is a tangy seasonal fruit that is high in vitamin C.
Amla (Indian gooseberry) is a tangy seasonal fruit that is high in vitamin C.
A is for… Amla (Indian gooseberry)
A is for… Amla (Indian gooseberry)
19 March 2014

The Ismaili Nutrition Centre has launched a new series of articles on simple ideas for popular foods. This A to Z of different fruits, vegetables and everyday ingredients builds greater awareness of basic nutrition and encourages you to try healthy and easy ideas for preparing a range of tasty dishes. This week's entry is about amla, a tangy seasonal fruit that is high in vitamin C.

The fibre, complex carbohydrates and protein in pulses are a great combination for satisfying hunger and keeping you full, helping you to eat less overall and preventing your blood sugar from spiking too often.
The fibre, complex carbohydrates and protein in pulses are a great combination for satisfying hunger and keeping you full, helping you to eat less overall and preventing your blood sugar from spiking too often.
Pump up the pulses to control diabetes
Pump up the pulses to control diabetes
2 January 2014

Over 50 per cent of people with pre-diabetes who eat healthier and are physically active can delay or even entirely prevent themselves from becoming diabetic. For those who have type 2 diabetes, eating cooked pulses along with a high-fibre diet can help control long term blood sugar levels.

Non-communicable diseases like diabetes, cancer and heart disease are the leading cause of mortality around the world, but they can be prevented by diet and lifestyle changes.
Non-communicable diseases like diabetes, cancer and heart disease are the leading cause of mortality around the world, but they can be prevented by diet and lifestyle changes.
Recognising and combatting the threat of NCDs
Recognising and combatting the threat of NCDs
5 July 2013

In 2008, non-communicable diseases were responsible for an astounding 63 per cent of deaths world-wide – more than all other causes combined. Known as NCDs, they include diabetes, heart disease and cancers, and are a growing concern to people of South East Asian descent. However, these diseases are largely preventable and their impact can be significantly reduced.

Children at Bait-ul Ilm snack on a healthy plate of vegetables.
Children at Bait-ul Ilm snack on a healthy plate of vegetables.
Are you feeding your children empty calories?
Are you feeding your children empty calories?
9 April 2013

Childhood obesity rates in the United States have more than tripled in the past thirty years, with many other western countries showing similar trends. What foods are children eating that may be contributing to this epidemic, and what can be done? Researchers at the US National Cancer Institute used the national nutrition survey database to find answers.

Use less salt when cooking. Rather than pouring salt straight from the container, measure out the amount you would like to add using a teaspoon.
Use less salt when cooking. Rather than pouring salt straight from the container, measure out the amount you would like to add using a teaspoon.
Reduce risk of high blood pressure with less sodium and more potassium
Reduce risk of high blood pressure with less sodium and more potassium
12 March 2013

Eating too much sodium and not enough potassium has been shown to increase blood pressure, which can be dangerous because it makes the heart work harder than normal and can lead to heart disease or stroke. Recently, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued new recommendations on how much sodium, salt and potassium people should eat for good health.

Keeping a record of what you eat for a few days will help you to know your habits and consider what changes you can make.
Keeping a record of what you eat for a few days will help you to know your habits and consider what changes you can make.
How to make small changes that last
How to make small changes that last
12 February 2013

Small lifestyle changes are easier to sustain and are more likely to last. Making a drastic change is difficult and less likely to be successful. Rather than focusing on immediate results, it is better to take things one step at a time and not to become discouraged.

Set goals are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Timely — otherwise known as SMART goals.
Set goals are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Timely — otherwise known as SMART goals.
Start the new year healthy with SMART goals
Start the new year healthy with SMART goals
17 January 2013

The start of a new year is a great time to make improvements to your lifestyle habits, whether by being more active or cooking more healthily. Setting SMART goals is an effective approach that can be used not only for health, but also in other aspects of life.

Colourful, delicious, and nutritious: pea and bean salad is a great source of fiber and protein, and it makes for a great snack or meal.
Colourful, delicious, and nutritious: pea and bean salad is a great source of fiber and protein, and it makes for a great snack or meal.
Solid foods can be more satisfying
Solid foods can be more satisfying
15 November 2012

The feeling of fullness is very difficult to measure, or even to understand, as there are many factors involved. Although some people believe that all calories are equal, researchers are finding that solid foods have some advantages over fluids.

Good food choices support intensive training while limiting risk of injury and illness.
Good food choices support intensive training while limiting risk of injury and illness.
Sport nutrition basics — how to win at any sport
Sport nutrition basics — how to win at any sport
14 March 2012

When talented, well-trained and enthusiastic athletes meet in competition, attention to detail can make all the difference between defeat and victory. What you eat and drink affects how well you train and whether you can compete at your best. Registered dietitian and sports nutritionist Linia Patel shares some tips.

Accompany your meal with plenty of salad.
Accompany your meal with plenty of salad.
Make healthy choices when eating out — South Asian style!
Make healthy choices when eating out — South Asian style!
8 March 2012

Eating out at an Indian or Pakistani restaurant can be nutritious; however, it is less healthy when food items are deep-fried, cooked in excess oil, or prepared in ghee, coconut oil or coconut milk. Here are some tips for making healthier choices.

Show secondary sidebar menu: