TheIsmaili > Family & Wellbeing > Family & Wellbeing
The Dreams and Dystopias exhibition in the Zamana Space at Ismaili Centre, London, offers an insight into East Africa’s diverse geography and colonial legacy.

Dreams and Distopias: East Africa at the Crossroads is the fourth exhibition to be held in the Zamana Space at the Ismaili Centre, London since its reopening earlier this year. The visual exhibit navigates the East African coastline through the lens of international artist Guillaume Bonn, to reveal a region perennially poised at a crossroads between two worlds.

Prince Rahim and President Naushad Jivraj share a light moment shortly before departing the Ismaili Centre.

On 10 October, Prince Rahim visited the Ismaili Centre, London to inaugurate the exhibition: Dreams and Dystopias, East Africa at the Crossroads, featuring photographic work by Guillaume Bonn.

Mawlana Hazar Imam shares a light moment with Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

On a crisp autumnal morning in London’s King’s Cross, Mawlana Hazar Imam welcomed Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge to the Aga Khan Centre, for a special event to celebrate the culture and heritage of Pakistan, and the contributions of the Pakistani diaspora to British society.

Mawlana Hazar Imam in conversation with Their Royal Highnesses, and the High Commissioner of Pakistan to the UK, His Excellency Mohammad Nafees Zakaria.

At the Aga Khan Centre on 2 October 2019, Mawlana Hazar Imam hosted Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. The special event provided a platform for guests whose interests and engagements encompass the wide-ranging relationship between the UK and Pakistan, including members of the Pakistani diaspora making a meaningful contribution to society in the United Kingdom and beyond. 

Mawlana Hazar Imam and Portugal’s Minister of State and Foreign Affairs, Rui Machete, sign a landmark agreement establishing a formal Seat of the Ismaili Imamat in Portugal, on June 4, 2015.

The internal divisions of the Shi‘i community - as highlighted in the first part of this article, which was published in the last edition of The Ismaili USA - can be traced to the dispute over the succession to Imam Ja‘far al-Sadiq (d. 148/765 CE). After his death, the majority of his followers eventually recognized his son Musa al-Kazim (d. 183/799 CE) as their next Imam. However, the other Shi‘i groups acknowledged the Imamat of Musa’s eldest half-brother Isma‘il, the eponym of the Isma‘ili Shi‘ia, or his son Muhammad b. Isma‘il as successors to the Imamat. Little is known about the life and career of Muhammad b. Isma‘il, the seventh Imam of the Isma‘ilis, who went into hiding, initiating a period of concealment (dawr al-satr) in early Ismaili history. This period of concealment lasted until the foundation of the Fatimid caliphate when the Ismaili Imams emerged openly as Fatimid Caliphs. Henceforth Imam Muhammad b. Isma‘il acquired the epithet al-Maktum (the hidden one), in addition to al-Maymun (the fortunate one).

Topics