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The tour ended at the magnificent green domed Masjid Malcolm Shabazz which was founded in 1956. The mosque hosts interfaith congregants, a school, and continues to be a hub of religious life in a rapidly-changing corner of Harlem.

Muslims have been a part of New York City, even before New York was a city. Records show that Muslims arrived in the area as part of the Dutch settlement, New Amsterdam, since the 1600s. Today, there are now over 300 registered mosques in the City. This is how the Muslim Tour of Harlem, a historic neighborhood in New York, begins. Katie Merriman, a doctoral student of religious studies at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill escorted a group of New York City Ismailis on a tour of 400 years of Muslim history in New York. On a three-hour walking tour, participants expanded their knowledge of how Muslims have contributed to their city and continue to do so.

Mission Moon model prepared by one of the five teams from New York Headquarters Jamatkhana that participated in the Expo.

“Six- to nine-year-olds are like sponges, they are so smart and absorb everything going on around them. It’s the perfect age to expose them to new hobbies and interests.” -Shamrin Virani, Project Manager, Northeast

All New Yorkers were invited to a community Navroz celebration at the Children’s Museum of Manhattan.

A Navroz Celebration for New York City, through crafts and music activities that showcase the diversity of expression in the Ismaili community.

A selection of the IIS books donated to the Boston Public Library in January.

As an act of goodwill, community outreach, and to better inform the public about Islam and Shia Islam in particular, the Boston Jamat donated a selection of books published by the Institute of Ismaili Studies (IIS) to the Boston Public Library (BPL) system in January 2019.

State Representative Safiya Wazir with US Senator Maggie Hassan. Photo: Becky Field.

At just six years old, Safiya Wazir fled from Afghanistan as a refugee of the civil war. Wazir lived in Uzbekistan for a decade before arriving in the USA as a high school student. At the age of 16, she had to master a new language, and become familiar with a new culture - and lots of snow.

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