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it is important that senior citizens take the necessary steps to ensure they have a good quality of life financially, even after retirement.

The percentage of elderly people in Pakistan is expected to double to 12 percent by 2050, increasing the number of senior citizens to 40 million. This demographic transition impacts citizens of all ages. Therefore, it is important that senior citizens take the necessary steps to ensure they have a good quality of life financially, even after retirement. 

Through presentations and team-building activities, Girl Guides acquired the knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes to better promote sustainable development.

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) set forth by the United Nations (UN) in 2015 are envisioned to make the world a better place by 2030. In order to better understand the goals and their potential, the Ismaili Girl Guides in Pakistan attended a four-day summit at the Guides’ Association headquarters in Islamabad.

Jamati institutions in Pakistan have embarked on numerous initiatives to support the elderly and create opportunities for interaction between different generations.

The nature of life for the elderly has changed considerably in recent history. With advancements in science and healthcare, human lifespan has substantially increased and the majority of people in the world can expect to live past the age of 60. Jamati institutions in Pakistan have embarked on numerous initiatives to support the elderly and create opportunities for interaction between different generations.

Sana and Sumaira Lokhandwala with students of Muhammad Ali Girls Academy after delivering an Education Session.

Period poverty is a global issue. It is estimated that one in five girls in America have left school early or missed school because of their period. In India, approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Three young Ismailis are working to increase awareness, change perceptions, and increase access to menstrual hygiene products.

The three winners of the 2019 Global Pluralism Award: Aung Kyaw Moe on behalf of the Centre for Social Integrity, an organisation that provides youth from Myanmar’s conflict-affected regions with the skills to be leaders for change; Deborah Ahenkorah, a Ghanaian social entrepreneur and book publisher; and Igor Radulović on behalf of Learning History that is not yet History, a network in the Balkans developing a new approach to teaching the history of conflict.

The Global Centre for Pluralism (GCP) hosted the second biennial Global Pluralism Award ceremony in November 2019. At the ceremony, presided over by Mawlana Hazar Imam and attended by many members of the GCP’s Board, including Princess Zahra, the Centre recognised three winners who will each receive a $50,000 grant to help them continue their work.

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