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Thousands of people from various cultures came together to celebrate the end of Ramadan at the London Eid Festival in the city’s iconic Trafalgar Square on Saturday 8 June 2019.

Fête de la Musique, also known as World Music Day, is celebrated on 21 June every year. On this day, musicians around the world are urged to play and listen to music outdoors in their neighbourhoods, or in gardens, parks, and public spaces. In the lead-up to the occasion earlier this month, thousands of people gathered to celebrate Eid ul-Fitr at the London Eid Festival 2019 in Trafalgar Square, where they were treated to a special performance by the UK Jamat’s Ismaili Community Ensemble.

Prince Aly Muhammad is presented a bouquet of flowers upon his arrival in Immit, Ishkoman Punyal, Gilgit-Baltitsan in October 2017.

Prince Aly Muhammad Aga Khan, the youngest son of Mawlana Hazar Imam, released a short film earlier today about communities residing in Northern Pakistan.

AKHSS Kuragh Campus

“When I was younger, people didn’t know how to read,” recalled Musa Khan. “If we received a letter, we had to travel far to find someone who could read it for us. Today, every child in the area is enrolled in school.” The educational progress covered in Musa Khan’s lifetime is that of centuries. Musa is one of many teachers who have dedicated their lives to educating children in their communities in the Gilgit-Baltistan and Chitral regions of Pakistan. 

During the annual flagship concert of the Ismaili Community Ensemble, Riaz Rhemtulla and Scheherazaad Cooper bring the shadow landers to life through Kathak and Odissi dance forms.

The lyrics, movement and music that reverberated throughout the auditorium of the Britten Theatre at The Royal College of Music, captured the imaginations of hundreds in the audience. In their annual flagship performance, the Ismaili Community Ensemble demonstrated that historical literature represents an important expression of thought, culture and civilisation.

A view from within the court of the Danyore III Jamatkhana in Gilgit.

Part of a seismically unstable zone that is prone to earthquakes, floods, landslides and droughts, Pakistan's northern region has long been home to a signifiant Ismaili population. Several new purpose-built jamatkhana projects blend traditional building with new disaster-resistant techniques. From design and construction to finished product, the new structures offer a model to uplifit the quality of habitat throughout the region.

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