TheIsmaili > Family & Wellbeing > Family & Wellbeing
It is possible to coexist in a healthy way in both actual and virtual communities so long as balance is maintained and lines of communication remain open.

In today’s age, children are born into the world and in many cases the first thing they are exposed to by their parents is a smartphone to capture and share their newborn images. This is often an indication of things to come, where electronic devices become a consistent part of their lives. The presence of such devices mean that children are going online at a younger age, but what implications could this have?

In this age of constant connectivity, there is both an expectation and perhaps a desire to always be contactable, in a plethora of ways.

It is estimated that at the end of 2018, 51.2 per cent of the global population, or 3.9 billion people, were using the Internet. While the Internet has brought about many positive changes, there have also been some undesirable effects of its growth and increased usage.

Our days can become inundated by frivolous scrolling through endless social media feeds, and responding to a constant stream of messages.

The digital age has changed our lives in many parts of the world, inextricably tethering them to the Internet for the simplest to the most sophisticated of tasks. In the first of a new series of articles on how to use digital media safely, Altaf Jiwa outlines the role that the Internet and social media have come to play in our daily lives.

SFU President and Vice-Chancellor Andrew Petter adjusts the ceremonial SFU robe on Mawlana Hazar Imam as part of honorary degree conferral ceremony.

In an historic joint ceremony in Vancouver, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and Simon Fraser University (SFU) each conferred Mawlana Hazar Imam with an honorary Doctor of Laws degree in recognition of his lifelong service to humanity.

AKU President Firoz Rasul, SFU President and Vice-Chancellor Andrew Petter, Mawlana Hazar Imam, UBC President and Vice-Chancellor Santa Ono, and University of Central Asia Board of Trustees Chairman Shams Kassim-Lakha pose for a ceremonial picture.

On 19 October, Mawlana Hazar Imam was conferred with honorary Doctor of Laws degrees from the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University at a joint ceremony, the first of its kind.

Topics