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The three winners of the 2019 Global Pluralism Award: Aung Kyaw Moe on behalf of the Centre for Social Integrity, an organisation that provides youth from Myanmar’s conflict-affected regions with the skills to be leaders for change; Deborah Ahenkorah, a Ghanaian social entrepreneur and book publisher; and Igor Radulović on behalf of Learning History that is not yet History, a network in the Balkans developing a new approach to teaching the history of conflict.

The Global Centre for Pluralism (GCP) hosted the second biennial Global Pluralism Award ceremony in November 2019. At the ceremony, presided over by Mawlana Hazar Imam and attended by many members of the GCP’s Board, including Princess Zahra, the Centre recognised three winners who will each receive a $50,000 grant to help them continue their work.

Mawlana Hazar Imam and Global Centre for Pluralism Secretary General Meredith Preston McGhie join the Global Pluralism Award recipients for a group photograph.

Mawlana Hazar Imam presided over the Global Pluralism Award ceremony on Wednesday 20 November, a biennial event hosted by the Global Centre for Pluralism. The Award recognises the extraordinary achievements of organisations, individuals, and governments around the world who exemplify living peacefully and productively with diversity.

AKAHI, Gujarat Police, and Gujarat Forest Department join hands in tree planting drive

The Aga Khan Agency for Habitat India (AKAHI) team in Rajula facilitated the plantation of one hundred different types of saplings to ensure environmental diversity and security. The tree plantation program was organized in collaboration with the Gujarat Forest Department at the Khakhbai Old Police Line area in Rajula, Gujarat. Police Inspector Udaysinh Dharmendrasinh Jadeja and his team guided and supported their efforts.

Farmers from Sangodra showing off their turmeric crop which was grown under the guidance of the United Farmers Alliance and the Junagadh Agriculture University

Raju Bhai Kotadia (name changed) was a troubled man – besides the usual issues such as weather dependence, market prices and input availability that one would normally associate a farmer with, he was very concerned about damage to his crops by stray animals. Most nights he would stay up guarding his field from damage by these animals to which he sometimes lost as much as 30% of his produce.

 

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