TheIsmaili > Family & Wellbeing > Family & Wellbeing
Through presentations and team-building activities, Girl Guides acquired the knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes to better promote sustainable development.

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) set forth by the United Nations (UN) in 2015 are envisioned to make the world a better place by 2030. In order to better understand the goals and their potential, the Ismaili Girl Guides in Pakistan attended a four-day summit at the Guides’ Association headquarters in Islamabad.

Jamati institutions in Pakistan have embarked on numerous initiatives to support the elderly and create opportunities for interaction between different generations.

The nature of life for the elderly has changed considerably in recent history. With advancements in science and healthcare, human lifespan has substantially increased and the majority of people in the world can expect to live past the age of 60. Jamati institutions in Pakistan have embarked on numerous initiatives to support the elderly and create opportunities for interaction between different generations.

Over the last two and a half years, a husband and wife team from Vancouver, Canada, have helped to establish the palliative programme at the Aga Khan University (AKU) Hospital in Karachi. Through onsite visits, numerous remote conferences, and ongoing correspondence with the local team, the couple were able to set up a sustainable, long-term programme, the first of its kind in Pakistan.

Last month, young members of the Jamat in Pakistan had the opportunity to tour interior Sindh and Karachi on a journey to reflect on and understand the importance of cultural heritage. The trip was organised as part of the Heritage Discovery Tour (HDT), a flagship programme of the Arts and Culture portfolio of the Aga Khan Youth and Sports Board for Pakistan.

Over the last decade, Vancouver-based Iqbal Lalany has served on several TKN assignments to provide extensive medical response training in areas that need it most. In 2011, Iqbal received a call from Dr Firoz Verjee, then Coordinator of the AKDN’s Disaster Risk Management Initiative (DRMI). Iqbal was asked if he could deliver First Aid training for six weeks, a challenge he graciously accepted. At the time, although Iqbal was working for Scouts Canada, he was fortunate to take four weeks of vacation time and a two-week leave of absence, (approved by Alamin Pirani, Scouts Canada’s Executive Director) so Iqbal could serve on this TKN assignment.

Topics