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Khurrum Wahid, another candidate for the position of Coral Springs Commissioner Seat 2, addresses the Ismaili Jamat present at the Meet and Greet.

In a Meet and Greet event hosted in the Ft. Lauderdale Jamatkhana, attendees had an opportunity to have their voices heard by the six candidates running for the position of Coral Springs Commissioner Seat 2. The event included an audience of Jamati and other community members.

Zameer Rayani receiving the “Just Do It Award’ from Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos.

“I didn’t believe it until I was shaking his hand,” Zameer Rayani admits. When his presence was requested at Amazon’s recent All-Hands Meeting in Seattle, he didn’t even share with his family or friends. After all, no one from the HR department had ever won the award in the company’s 25-year history, but with numerous Ismaili Amazonians live-streaming the event around the world, messages like this spread like wildfire on social media: “Do you know Zameer Rayani? Sounds Ismaili, he just got an award from Bezos at our company All-Hands!”

Members of Miami Jamat engaged in games after Jamatkhana ceremonies.

Three local members from Miami translated vision into reality. This program directly benefits the mental health, confidence levels, and social skills of individuals. The advantages:  newly gained traits will not only enhance the feeling of community belonging, but will also reflect positively outside the Ismaili community—confident youth, a new skill set, and better mental health.

Yasmin Dharamsi (on left in red shirt), with President Zahra Hayat-Daya of the Council for Florida (in blue) and other participants in the Parkland Dash.

Most of us have thought of running a marathon or a race, but very few of us have actually ran one, let alone finish in top positions among hundreds of other runners.

Alaudin Bhanji receiving NASA's Outstanding Leadership Award, in 2014. He is with the (then) Director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Dr. Charles Elachi (L), and Dr. John M. Grunsfeld, Associate Administrator, Science Mission Directorate, NASA.

It is a rare and historic honor to have an object in space named after an individual. It is usually reserved for someone who first discovers it, generally after years of painstaking observation of the night sky through giant telescopes. So to be recognized in this manner is indeed an occasion worthy of note. Yet, this is precisely what happened at the end of 2018.

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