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The United Bakers Co-operative Society Limited (UBCL) whipped up a record-breaking 940 kg cake to commemorate Mawlana Hazar Imam’s Diamond Jubilee visit to Hyderabad.

For nearly two decades, the United Bakers Co-operative Society Limited has been aggregating the interests and aspirations of local Jamati bakeries in Hyderabad. From centralised procurement to training and development, the alliance’s story illustrates that bonds of trust and collaboration can catalyse economic development. We take a look at the recipe behind their sweet story of success.

AKEPB in Afghanistan have organised programmes focusing on the empowerment of women; promoting handicrafts and other products, and providing encouragement to launch small businesses.

Improving quality of life requires a multifaceted-approach, of which economic empowerment represents an important piece. If an  individual or community is empowered economically this can result in having access to better education, health, safety, an enabling environment, and desired working and living conditions.  

A day in the life of a farmer: GE Expedition participants join in an early morning excursion with Ismaili farmers.

In December 2019, Global Encounters (GE) Expedition brought together young Ismailis from 13 countries to the rural areas of Southern Saurashtra in Gujarat to engage with the local Jamat and study the work of the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN). The impact of Expedition on its participants is well known, but the impact that Expedition has on the Jamat in Southern Saurashtra is equally profound.

Investing in the early years can help to ensure that each young person can eventually reach their fullest potential.

Scientific research has shown that 90 percent of brain growth happens before a child begins school. During this time, the foundation is laid for health and wellbeing throughout life. As such, investing in the early years of a child’s life is one of the smartest investments a parent or community can make. The Parwaaz Early Childhood Development (ECD) programme in Afghanistan aims to ensure that every child has the right start to life.

Participants enroute, via boat, to the Arcadia Education Project. The school, which won the 2019 Award, is an amphibious structure, built on land, that is flood-prone.

It’s a cool and damp morning at a school in South Kanarchor, on the outskirts of Dhaka. As the children break for recess, they’re greeted by the sight of six young visitors, approaching the school by boat. The children clamour around the bamboo railings excitedly. Nestled in the heart of South Kanarchor is the Arcadia Education Project, one of the winners of the 2019 cycle of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture (AKAA). Built on land that floods regularly, the amphibious structure is an innovative solution that responds to climate, context, and community. And that’s exactly what the visitors were there to learn about.

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