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Comprehend, Inaara Tharani, Dallas

During the Diamond Jubilee Art Festivals, we witnessed with delight, galleries filled with paintings, sculptures, installation art, and photographs. Here, we depict women, as seen by some of them, and displayed at the various exhibitions.

Music Building, Kenyon College, Ohio. Project Team member, Khalil Pirani.

While in MIT’s Architecture program, Khalil Pirani would often sit in classes and hear professors ask: “What is Islamic architecture? Could this dome or that motif be in the spirit of Islam?” Khalil recalls, “I also had the same question.”

Right to Education: Shezana Virani, Chicago

Women have been artists since prehistoric times but have often been discouraged, marginalized and omitted from the history of art. This changed in the 20th century and today, women are amongst the most prolific artists, musicians, and writers including in the Muslim world. Some prominent contemporary examples are artists such as Shahzia Sikander, Nilima Sheikh, and Salima Arastu.

The prayer hall of the Ismaili Jamatkhana and Centre, Khorog. The geometric Kufic script at the wall articulates the names of the Ahl al-Bayt, or House of the Prophet.

Up close, a jewel is made up of a number of facets, each producing intriguing patterns, which help the gem to shine. Nestled amid flourishing trees, a flowing river, and a formidable mountain range, the Ismaili Jamatkhana and Centre in Khorog adds another facet to the ‘Jewel of the Pamir.’

Filmmaker and videographer/photographer, Parastu Aydarsho.

Most of us know the feeling of being moved by a work of art, whether it’s song, film, painting or poem. When we are touched, we become aware of a feeling that may not be familiar to us but which transports us to a different emotional space.

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